close

The Department of Computer Science at the University of Cyprus cordially invites you to the Seminar entitled:

Analyzing Network-wide Interactions on the Internet: A Novel Graph-based Approach

Speaker: Mr. Marios Iliofotou
Affiliation: University of California - Riverside, USA
Category: Seminar
Location: Room 147, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences (FST-01), 1 University Avenue, 2109 Nicosia, Cyprus (directions)
Date: Monday, May 31st, 2010
Time: 14:00-15:00 EET
Host: Demetris Zeinalipour (dzeina AT cs.ucy.ac.cy)
URL: https://www.cs.ucy.ac.cy/colloquium/presentations.php#cs.ucy.pres.2010.iliofotou

Abstract:
Monitoring network traffic and classifying applications are essential functions for network administrators. These tasks are becoming increasingly challenging since (a) many applications obfuscate their traffic, e.g., using nonstandard ports, and (b) new applications constantly appear. This suggests the need for a behavioral-based approach, where the detector looks for fundamental behaviors of the application that are both intrinsic to the application and distinct from the rest of the traffic. Identifying intrinsic behaviors makes it difficult for application writers to disguise such behaviors without defeating the very purpose of the application. For example, it will be challenging to design a P2P file-sharing protocol and at the same time eliminate the need for a peer to interact with multiple other users in the network. In our work, we propose a graph-based representation of network traffic, which captures the network-wide interactions of applications. In these graphs, nodes are individual IP address and edges between nodes represent particular communications. For example, an edge might represent the exchange of a single packet, or the exchange of at least ten packets of any type. We call such graphs "Traffic Dispersion Graphs" or TDGs. Our study shows that TDGs provide valuable information about the network and the applications being used. As a proof of concept, we build a graph-based traffic classification system and show it outperforms the state-of-the-art in detecting traffic on backbone links. Our results are very promising, showing that TDGs can provide the basis for the next generation of network monitoring tools.

Short Bio:
Marios Iliofotou received the B.S. degree in electrical and computer engineering from the Technical University of Crete, in Greece, in 2005 and the M.S. degree in computer science from the University of California, Riverside, in 2007. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of California, Riverside and is expected to earn his doctorate in computer science, in summer 2010. His current research investigates the effectiveness of graph-based algorithms for network monitoring and security. During his PhD, Marios has worked as an Intern at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Telefonica Research (Internet research group), and Cisco Systems, Inc.

  Other Presentations Web: https://www.cs.ucy.ac.cy/colloquium/presentations.php
  Colloquia Web: https://www.cs.ucy.ac.cy/colloquium/
  Calendar: http://testing.in.cs.ucy.ac.cy/louispap/XCS-3.0/schedule/cs.ucy.pres.2010.iliofotou.ics